Boston Bests the West: World Series Recap

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Boston Bests the West: World Series Recap

MANDY RUSCH • THE SPECTATOR

MANDY RUSCH • THE SPECTATOR

MANDY RUSCH • THE SPECTATOR

MANDY RUSCH • THE SPECTATOR

Alec Downing, Editor-in-Chief

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The Boston Red Sox are the 2018 World Series Champions, taking the series over the Los Angeles Dodgers with relative ease. Their fourth title since the year 2000, the Red Sox have won the pennant the most of any team so far in the 21st century.

For the second year in a row, the Dodgers were runner-ups, falling short of claiming their first title since 1988. Last year falling to the Houston Astros in seven games and this year to the Red Sox in just five.

Boston did exactly what they did in the regular season—won games, at home and on the road. With the best regular season record of 2018 at 108- 54, best home record at 57-24, and second-best road record at 51-30, the Red Sox continued their dominance into the postseason.

Game one was a matchup between two of the games premier pitchers, the Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw and the Red Sox’ Chris Sale, but in this outing, they looked anything but. Kershaw once again did little to silence his detractors, giving up five earned runs over just four innings. Chris Sale did not fare much better also lasting just four innings, but only allowing three runs.

Boston came out on top 8-4 and followed this up with a 4-2 victory in game two.

Game three was a story unto itself. The Dodgers lone victory in the series, the game now holds the title of longest World Series game ever played—by both innings at 18 and total time. The two foes sent a total of 18 pitchers to the mound, emptying out their respective bullpens and utilizing starting pitchers in relief roles.

In the bottom of the 15th inning Dodgers first baseman, Max Muncy swatted a ball deep to right field, only for it to hook foul at the last second. Three more innings would pass until Muncy would return to the plate, leading off the bottom of the 18th.

Muncy sent the ball into the stands and sent the Dodgers, and the weary, but now hopeful Dodgers fans home.

MANDY RUSCH • THE SPECTATOR
MANDY RUSCH • THE SPECTATOR

While the loss could easily have demoralized the Red Sox and served as a catalyst for a Dodgers comeback in the series, Boston appeared unphased by the 18 inning marathon game and won game four 9-6 after resting for mere hours.

Now one win away from the pennant, the Red Sox entered game five with a commanding 3-1 series lead. The game saw Kershaw return to the mound to face Red Sox pitcher David Price. Kershaw was outdueled again and the Red Sox took game five 5-1.

The Red Sox added salt to the wound as they celebrated, though their slight was not directed at their World Series opponents.

Feeling the need to remind the Yankees of their preemptive exit from this years postseason—at Boston’s hands nonetheless—Red Sox pitcher Eduardo Rodriguez paraded around the clubhouse carrying a speaker on his shoulder and leading his teammates in a rousing rendition of Frank Sinatra’s, “New York, New York.” a song played at Yankee stadium to celebrate each home victory. Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge caused controversy when he played the song after game two of the American League Division which was hosted by Boston.

Propelled by a well constructed and talent-laden roster, the Red Sox capped off another successful season with a pennant and some trolling of the Yankees for good measure.

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